Tag Archives: mineral water plant manufacturer

Mineral & Packaged Drinking Water

Are Packaged Drinking Water And Mineral Water The Same

Are the packaged drinking water and mineral water the same? Although these two types of water are both safe for drinking, they differ in many ways. Here are some of the major differences between packaged drinking water and mineral water.

Just like air, water is also a very important element that all living things including the human beings, animals, and plants need to survive. Water is indeed essential to life. Without it, there will be no life at all. Gone were the days when we can directly drink from a natural water spout or from faucets without worrying about getting ill due to some water-borne diseases.  Because of industrialization and pollution, today’s tap water is no longer safe for drinking. That is why many people in India and in different parts of the world now prefer drinking packaged drinking water or mineral water despite being more expensive than tap water.

Faucets

You might have already heard about packaged drinking water and mineral water. But the big question is that do you think these two are the same or not? The truth is, although these two types of water are both safe for drinking, they differ in many ways. Let us take a look at some of the major differences between packaged drinking water and mineral water.

Defining packaged drinking water and mineral water

Before identifying their differences, let us first define what is packaged drinking water and what is mineral water.

Packaged drinking water is a drinking water that has been sourced out by the packaged drinking water plant from a spring water, well, or drilled water source and has gone through a distillation process. After the process, the water is packaged in either plastic or glass water bottles and then sealed to ensure it remains highly potable and safe for drinking.

Packaged and Mineral Drinking Water

Mineral water is a drinking water with minerals and other dissolved substances in it like gases, sulfur compounds, and salts. It may contain natural minerals or artificial minerals which are added to the water with the use of Drops of Balance.

Major differences between packaged drinking water and mineral water

Taste

The taste of the mineral water is distinct from that of a packaged drinking water. Because of its mineral content, mineral water has a taste that is the same as that of a fresh natural water. On the other hand, the taste of the packaged drinking water can vary according to the quality of its source, treatment method used, and natural mineral content. In most cases, though, packaged mineral water has the same taste as that of a tap water.

Filtration and treatment

There are various treatment methods that bottled water plants use to eliminate microbial hazards. These methods include electromagnetic radiation, purification processes like water distillation, filtration, and sedimentation, chemical processes chlorination and flocculation, and biological processes.

Drinking Water

Mineral water goes through a natural process of filtration and coagulation. It is treated with Aluminum Sulfate or other sulfate minerals. Whilst, the packaged drinking water is chemically filtered and chemically treated, most often through chlorination.

Cost

Packaged drinking water usually goes through a series of processes in order to completely eliminate all the contaminants from the water. This is why it is relatively more expensive as compared to the artificially treated bottled mineral water and to tap water. The ro plant cost for packaged water is also higher than that of the mineral water.

On the other end, the mineral water is more affordable than packaged drinking water regardless of whether it is naturally or artificially treated.

Purified Water

What Is The Differenece Between RO and DI Water Purification?

Today, people look for different water purification systems and then often ask the difference between RO and DI water purifications. Both the water purifications are different from each other and we need to understand each technology individually.

Reverse Osmosis or commonly known as RO is the opposite of a natural process simply called osmosis. Osmosis is the natural movement of water molecules across a semipermeable membrane. The process naturally moves water from a low ion concentration to a higher ion concentration across a semipermeable membrane. This natural process is used by our bodies to get water to our individual cells.

Reverse Osmosis semipermeable membrane

By applying pressure to the more concentrated (dirtier) side of a semipermeable membrane, water molecules are pushed back across the membrane to the less concentrated (cleaner) side, resulting in more purified water. This process is called Reverse Osmosis and can typically remove 90-99% of most contaminants. Though this technique or method may not be 100% perfect, it is extremely cost effective as the RO Membrane can last for quite some times or let’s say few years if used properly and with care. Reverse Osmosis is often used to partially clean-up tap water before any other purification technology is used to remove the remaining 1-10% of contaminants.

Coming to DI water purification system or better known as Deionization has many names like Ion Exchange, Strong Acid/Strong Base, Polishing, Nuclear Grade and so on. Nuclear grade DI filters can remove inorganic chemicals down to very low parts per billon (PPB) levels. This makes them excellent for producing Ultra-Purified (Type I, 18.2 Megohm) water. Water of this quality is used with the most sensitive laboratory analytical instruments, which are designed to detect chemicals at extremely low concentration levels.

water purification system

The Deionization filters function by exchanging positive hydrogen and negative hydroxyl molecules for the positive and negative contaminant molecules in the water. Positive chemicals, like calcium, exchange places with the hydrogen molecules and negative chemicals, like iodine, exchange places with the hydroxyl molecules. Over a period of time, positive and negative contaminants in the water displace all the active hydrogen and hydroxyl molecules on the DI resin and then the filter needs replacement. Regeneration of the deionization filter is possible, but only in an industrial environment setting.

Deionization is an on-demand process supplying purified water when needed. This is important because water at this extreme purity level degrades quickly. The nuclear grade deionization resin or polishing mixed bed resin removes almost all the inorganic contaminants in the water increasing the resistivity of the water to a maximum of 18.2 megohm-cm. However, deionization alone does not remove all types of contaminants like dissolved organic chemicals. Deionization filters are not physical filters with a pore size and cannot remove bacteria or particulates.

Here, compared to RO purification system DI treatment can be expensive. In other words quickly using up the purification capacity of deionization filters can be an expensive option for labs that choose to supply tap water to UltraPure (Type I) Polishing Systems.

Today there are several tests for identifying the purity level of water. The simplest test is a direct measurement of electrical conductivity or resistivity. Most inorganic chemicals are either negatively charged (anions) or positively charged (cations), and therefore transmit an electrical current when electrodes are inserted in the water. The more ions present, the greater the conductivity, or the lower the resistivity of the sample water.

Conductivity is expressed in microsiemens/cm and is used to measure water with a large number of ions present. Resistivity is expressed in megohms-cm and is used in the measurement of water with few ions. Conductivity and resistivity are mathematical reciprocals of each other. Therefore, at 25° C, 18.2 megohm water, which is the highest purity water obtainable also, has a conductivity of 0.055 microsiemen/cm.

Remember, both RO and DI purification systems are excellent in their own ways and it solely depends on what purpose we need the purified water for.